Tracey Pearson, Edwardsville

Christiane Hubbard, East St. Louis

Derrick Sykes, St. Louis

April Hicks, Edwardsville

Emily York, Equality, IL

Mike Stout, St. Charles

Justin Allen, Granville, NY

The quality of life is so much more important than the quantity of live. I’m somewhat partial to the argument because I suffer from asthma, so I know how it feels to have no quality of life. In this particular case, I would have to agree with the living will.
Tracey Pearson, Edwardsville

She made the decision to die –so pull the tube. Why would she want to live 16 years in a vegetative state?
Christiane Hubbard, East St. Louis

It’s all about choice. It is the person’s wish, then man has the absolute right to honor that wish. Why prolong this person’s suffering, while at the same time add stress to those providing care for her?
Derrick Sykes, St. Louis

I believe a legal document expressing a decision to die should be honored. I don’t know why government has become involved in this case, because if I make a decision, I don’t want anyone to un-make my decision, just because it’s in the news.
April Hicks, Edwardsville

As a medical professional, I took an oath to honor the wishes expressed in a living will. Personally, my religious belief is that God should make the ultimate decision.
Emily York, Equality, Ill.

I believe a person has the right to make a decision to live or die--only if that request is expressed in a legal document. I also feel the husband or family member should have the right to honor that decision without government’s involvement.
Mike Stout, St. Charles

In the Schiavo case, she expressed her wishes to her husband, so now he’s her legal guardian and legally speaking the parents have no rights. Technically speaking, even though she is still alive, she’s not the same woman her husband married. So, even if she is kept alive, her quality of life won’t be the same.
Justin Allen, Granville, N.Y.

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