Illinois Supreme Court News

The astounding reversal on Illinois’ pension crisis

By Ted Dabrowski, Wirepoints | Feb 7, 2019

Governor J.B. Pritzker has made his position clear on pensions: No reforms. Not necessary. Just pay them. Nobody in the Democratic party, which holds supermajorities in both the House and the Senate, has voiced any dissent.

Judge Barry Julian is off to a bad start

By The Madison County Record | Jan 31, 2019

Do the laws that the rest of us residents must follow not apply to the ones making and interpreting them?

IL Supreme Court: Ex-wife can't use past temp injunction to stop husband's sons from getting his IRA

By Scott Holland | Jan 28, 2019

The Illinois Supreme Court says a man had the right to name his children the rightful heirs of his retirement funds, even though his ex-wife contended a court order in place during divorce proceedings should have prevented it.

IL Supreme Court: No actual harm needed to sue businesses for scanning fingerprints, other biometric IDs

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jan 25, 2019

The Illinois Supreme Court says an Illinois privacy law doesn’t require plaintiffs to prove they were actually harmed before suing businesses and others who scan and store their fingerprints or other so-called biometric identifiers. And the decision will give a green light to dozens of class action lawsuits already pending against businesses of all sizes in the state’s courts, with even more likely to follow.

Can Pritzker keep promise to stop Illinois gerrymandering?

By Austin Berg, Illinois News Network | Jan 25, 2019

Illinois House Republicans are out with an independent mapmaking plan. And Gov. J.B. Pritzker is on the record saying he’ll reject a legislative map drawn under political influence. The 2020 census is just around the corner, after which Illinois must redraw its district lines.

Monsanto pollution plaintiffs want settlement invalidated; Hearing set today

By Record News | Jan 15, 2019

BELLEVILLE – Almost 300 plaintiffs in pollution suits have called on St. Clair County Chief Judge Andrew Gleeson to invalidate a settlement between their lawyers and Monsanto.

People suing Google over facial geometry scans of photos must prove real harm, not just 'feel aggrieved': Judge

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jan 2, 2019

Saying the plaintiffs bringing the action must show how they were actually harmed, a Chicago federal judge has closed the window on a class action lawsuit accusing Google of violating an Illinois privacy law by automatically creating and storing face scans of people in photos uploaded to its Google Photos service.

Supreme Court grants attorney leave to challenge appeals court decision over legal malpractice claim

By John Breslin | Dec 17, 2018

An Edwardsville attorney was granted leave to appeal by the Illinois Supreme Court in a case with its roots in a claim of legal malpractice.

Happy Birthday: The solution that never was to Illinois' pension crisis

By Austin Berg, Illinois Policy Institute | Dec 12, 2018

Illinoisans should know lawmakers in the past made big moves to fix the state's worst-in-the-nation pension crisis. It’s politically possible. They just need a little reminder of our history.

Applications for associate judge in Third Circuit due Jan. 7

By Kasey Schefflin-Emrich | Dec 10, 2018

Attorneys residing in the Third Judicial Circuit have until Jan. 7 to file an application to become the circuit’s new associate judge.

Illinois Supreme Court defends inflated pensions for Chicago union leaders

By Adam Schuster, Illinois Policy Institute | Dec 4, 2018

Once again proving why the state must amend the Illinois Constitution’s pension clause, the court unanimously ruled in favor of a special perk that inflated union leader pensions to nearly three times the pension of the average worker.

Legitimacy of ‘good faith’ settlement questioned

By The Madison County Record | Nov 28, 2018

When two parties in litigation agree to a “good faith” settlement, that’s good, right? It brings the dispute to an end sooner, ensures that the outcome is acceptable to both sides, and eliminates the risk of a decision less favorable to one side or the other.

IL Supreme Court questions whether mom must prove 'harm' to sue over teen's Six Flags fingerprint scan

By Jonathan Bilyk | Nov 20, 2018

Illinois Supreme Court justices appeared to take a dim view of assertions by a lawyer for Six Flags that a mother can't sue the theme park operator after the company required him to scan his fingerprints to use his park season pass, even though she had not provided consent.

Objector wants class counsel fees in $250 million Hale settlement cut; Says they could have won much more at trial

By Record News | Nov 19, 2018

EAST ST. LOUIS – Lawyers who reached a $250 million settlement with State Farm don’t deserve a third in fees because they likely would have won much more at trial, according to class member Lisa Marlow of Cocoa, Fla.

Monsanto again seeks review of appellate decision that cast doubt on settlement of 11,256 pollution claims

By Record News | Nov 19, 2018

SPRINGFIELD – For a second time, Monsanto has asked the Illinois Supreme Court to review a Fifth District appellate court opinion that vacated a good faith order in a settlement between Monsanto and 11,256 plaintiffs.

Overstreet wins permanent seat at Fifth District, likely shifting balance 5-2 conservative

By Ann Maher | Nov 6, 2018

Justice David Overstreet has easily won a permanent seat to the Fifth District Appellate Court.

Customers should read insurance policies, not wait to sue til denied coverage, high court rules

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 22, 2018

Saying customers have an obligation to read and understand the terms of their insurance policies, the Illinois state Supreme Court has rejected the try by a couple to make their American Family Insurance agent pay for providing them with a policy that didn’t protect them against a defamation lawsuit, even though they had specifically asked the agent to obtain that coverage for them.

Holbrook says only one complaint over machines during early voting - from Belleville lawyer wanting to cast 'no' on retention

By John Breslin | Oct 18, 2018

Only one complaint over a possible glitch in voting machines has been fielded during early voting, according to St. Clair County Clerk Tom Holbrook.

Six former library employees have taken home more than $1 million in pension benefits

By Austin Berg, Illinois Policy Institute | Oct 15, 2018

Large pension payouts in the face of flat incomes for taxpayers raise questions of fairness.

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