Woman treated for thyroid condition sues doctors for not administering pregnancy test

Kelly Holleran Mar. 31, 2009, 10:53am

A woman claims her daughter was born with hypothyroidism after doctors at Memorial Hospital injected her with radioactive iodine while she was pregnant.

Anastasia Parker sued Dr. Mohamed Megahy, Belleville Oncology and Maryville Oncology, Dr. Wael F. Girgis and Memorial Hospital in St. Clair County Circuit Court on March 27, claiming her daughter, Taelor Hannah, will be forced to undergo medical treatment for the rest of her life to treat the hypothyroidism.

Anastasia Parker claims she underwent a thyroidectomy in 2006, which was followed by the administration of an ablative dose of radioactive iodine.

On April 12, 2007, and on May 1, 2007, radioactive iodine was again administered to Anastasia Parker, according to the complaint.

However, before Megahy and Girgis administered the treatment, they failed to test Anastasia Parker to see if she was pregnant, the suit states.

At the time of the radioactive iodine injections, Anastasia Parker was pregnant with her daughter, Taelor Hannah, who was born on Aug. 3, 2007, and diagnosed with hypothyroidism a short time late.

"The hypothyroidism diagnosed in the Plaintiff, Taelor Hannah, was caused by the administration of the radioactive iodine, or I-131, referred to in the foregoing paragraphs," the suit states.

Because of the radioactive iodine that was administered to Anastasia Parker during her pregnancy, Taelor Hannah is at an increased risk for developmental delays, cognitive deficits, early development of cancer in her teens and mental retardation, the complaint says.

Megahy, Belleville Oncology and Maryville Oncology, Girgis and Memorial Hospital were at fault because they failed to perform a pregnancy test before administering the iodine, failed to recognize Anastasia Parker's age and sex before administering the iodine and failed to inform Anastasia Parker of the risks of the iodine, according to the complaint.

They also negligently failed to consult with appropriate physicians before administering the iodine, failed to recognize the risks of administering it and failed to confirm Anastasia Parker was not pregnant when they administered the iodine, she claims.

In the 10-count suit, Anastasia Parker is seeking a judgment in excess of $500,000, plus costs.

Ray E. Alexander of Brown and Crouppen in St. Louis will be representing her.

<>i>St. Clair County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-157.

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