The Madison County Record Sep. 4, 2014, 1:22pm

What is it with Mick Jagger? If anyone should be sated by now, it should be him. So rich and so famous, at such a young age and for so long after, and so little real talent to justify any of it.

For five decades Mick's been driving in his car, watching his TV, riding around the world, doing this and signing that and trying to make some girl – and yet, after half a century of trying, he still can't get no sat-is-fac-tion.

At least, not four full syllables' worth of it.

Christopher Durr is similarly afflicted. Thinking he'd been billed for services not rendered, he asked for a full refund and promptly got one, but he's still not satisfied.

Over a five-year period, the City of Alton charged Durr a refuse fee for trash collection, even though the business he operates is required to arrange and pay for its own garbage pick-up. Durr complained about the charges on Jan. 23, 2013. The City investigated the matter, confirmed that the billing had been in error, and mailed him a full refund on Feb. 12, which Durr cashed or deposited “soon thereafter.”

Some time in the next ten months, Durr realized that he was not satisfied with Alton's prompt and thorough resolution of his complaint. Last December, with the estimable G. Edward Moorman serving as counsel, he filed suit against the City. Plaintiff and lawyer hope to turn the suit into a class action, ostensibly representing any or all businesses in Alton billed erroneously for trash collection.

Responding to the City’s motion to dismiss, Moorman acknowledged that Durr received a refund, but insisted that “there is no evidence of the existence of any written release or satisfaction, nor does defendant cite facts beyond the issuance of the check to show that it was or was intended to be a release of satisfaction.”

The judge should recognize Durr as one of those people who can't be satisfied and treat him accordingly.

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